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Released to collectors November 9, 2014, along with 

                    Doolittle Raiders,  Lydia Mendoza,  O. Henry,  and  Jimmy Stewart

Emancipation

Proclamation

First Day of Issue

$17
    
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In the 24 years of painting covers, I have never painted a portrait of President Abraham Lincoln.  Interestingly, the Emancipation Proclamation did not declare free all the slaves in America, rather only those slaves held by the "rebellious" states, hence the south.  In time though, it did lead to the 13th Amendment.

BEVIL ISSUE

SCOTT

CATEGORY

CANCELLED

LOCATION

PAINTED

MAIN LOT

ARTIST’S PROOFS

AFDCS VARIETY

COFFEE BREAK

ISSUE TOTAL SIZE

 

 

601

4721

First Day of Issue

January 1, 2013

Washington, D.C. 20066

November 2014

150

10

1

1

162

  

The original of the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863, is in the    National Archives in Washington, D.C.  With the text covering 5 pages, the document was first tied with narrow, red and blue ribbons, which were attached to the signature page by a wafered impression of the seal of the United States.  Most of the ribbon remains.  Parts of the seal are decipherable, but other parts have worn off.  The document was bound with other proclamations in a large volume preserved for many years by the Department of State.  In 1936, the Emancipation Proclamation was transferred from the Department of State to the National Archives of the United States.  Lincoln initially proposed the idea of the   Emancipation Proclamation to his cabinet in the summer of 1862 as a war measure to   cripple the Confederacy.  He surmised that if the slaves in the Southern states were freed, then the Confederacy could no longer use them as laborers to support the army in the field, thus hindering the  effectiveness of the Confederate war effort.      Lincoln needed to prove that the Union government could enforce the Proclamation and protect the freed slaves.  On September 22, 1862, following the Union victory at the Battle of Antietam, the           Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation was issued, and would go into effect 3 months later on January 1, 1863.  President Lincoln  announced, “that all persons held as slaves, within the rebellious areas are, and henceforth shall be free.” 

 

Read the article in its entirety in the 6-page November 2014 Bevil newsletter, which accompanies the cover.