VIEW CART (0)‏

ALABAMA

$17
    

An influential black man of the community was approached by Senator Foster, asking for his help in gaining black support in the upcoming election. Adams agreed, on one condition; that Senator Foster help bring about a black school for freed slaves to learn a skill or trade to help them live in the free world. Senator Foster won the election, and Tuskegee University was born.

Greetings from

Take a trip

VIEW CART (0)‏

Released to collectors October 2014, along with 

                      Oklahoma,  Kansas,  Illinois,  Ohio,  and  Alaska

ISSUE

BEVIL#

SCOTT#

CATEGORY

CANCELLED

LOCATION

PAINTED

MAIN LOT

ARTIST'S PROOFS

AFDCS VARIETY

ISSUE TOTAL SIZE

 

The first African-American military aviators in the United States armed forces were the Tuskegee Airmen of WWII.   They were comprised of both fighter and bomber pilots, but the name also applies to the navigators, bombardiers, mechanics, instructors, crew chiefs, nurses, cooks and other  support personnel for the pilots.  It was World War II and at that time black Americans were still subject to the Jim Crow laws, thus the military was racially   segregated along with much of the federal government.  Before the Tuskegee Airmen, no African-American had been a U.S. military pilot,   although many had tried but were rejected.    In 1941, civil rights organizations and the black press exerted enough pressure to change all that.  Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama became the site of primary flight training for these pioneering pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen.  In fact, it was the only primary flight facility for African-American pilot candidates in the U.S. Army Air Corps during WWII.  The War Department had strict standards and accepted only those with a level of flight experience or higher education, ensuring that only the most able and intelligent African-American applicants were able to join. 

Read the complete article in the Bevil Newsletter,

which accompanies the cover when collected!

 

GREETINGS FROM ALABAMA

564

3561

FIRST DAY OF ISSUE

OCTOBER 25, 2002

NEW YORK, NY 10199

OCTOBER 2013

175

10

1

186

 

  

America wasn't sure if a black man could fly. Until Eleanor Roosevelt, the first lady, took a ride with Tuskegee's flight instructor. After that day, the black Tuskegee Airmen could focus on the real enemy; the Lutwaffe over the skies of Europe and Africa.