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BATMAN:

THE SILVER AGE

$68
    

 First Day of Issue 

The Silver age, which began in the mid 1950s, saw Batman for the first time meeting and teaming up with superhero Superman.  The contrasts of the two are striking, the most interestng and significant being that Batman has no super powers, relying soley on his discipline, training, physical strength, and toys. As the Silver Age comes to a close in the early 70s, Batman's popularity gets a big boost from the Batman TV series. With the series' influence, Batman comics take a light-hearted "campy" tone.

Sold as a set of four covers, along with

Batman-The Golden Age, Batman-The Bronze Age, and

Batman- The Modern Age

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SET OF FOUR

Released to collectors July 27, 2015, along with

Batman-The Golden Age,   Batman- The Bronze Age,  and  Batman-The Modern Age 

                  

Review the other three stamps in the set

BEVIL ISSUE

SCOTT#

CATEGORY 

CANCELLED

LOCATION 

MAIN LOT

ARTIST’S PROOFS

DCPs

AFDCS VARIETY

COFFEE BREAK

RIES CHAPTER

TOTAL ISSUE SIZE 

 

 

616

4934

FDC

October 9, 2014

NY NY 10199

150

10

35

1

1

1

198

 

 

  

By the late 1950s, Batman stories became more science fiction oriented in keeping with the times, as so many other DC characters had dabbled in that genre.  That is also the time frame in which Batwoman came on the scene.  In those stories, Batman battled space aliens, while morphing into strange transformations.  But by the mid 1960s, sales had fallen off drastically and DC Comics was actually thinking about killing off Batman completely.  As a last ditch effort, the then editor Julius Schwartz presided over some major changes which were cover-billed as the “New Look”.  In an effort to make Batman more contemporary, they needed to return him to a more detective-oriented role.  They retired Batwoman, and a few other characters, doing away with science-fiction storylines. 

 

Read the article in its entirety in the July  2015 Bevil newsletter, which accompanies the cover.

At the point, or moment I decide to take on an issue, I most often have an immediate idea of how I want the cover to feel, or maybe what objects I'll utilize.  When I said

yes to the Batman set, I instantly envisioned a Chicago-style I-beam and rivet element

in the design. Disappointed in not having enough room for a steel border around the

edges, I settled with the bolts, and then added the rust- I couldn't be more pleased.