Released to collectors July 27, 2015, along with

Batman-The Silver Age,  Batman- The Bronze Age,  and  Batman-The Modern Age 

                  

$68
    

 First Day of Issue 

Batman made his appearance in Detective Comics issue #27 in 1939.  This stamp and first day cover marks the first of four eras in the comic book world, The Golden Age.  Storylines in American history, whether it be novels or movies, tend to creep towards violence over time, not Batman.  In the beginning, he packed a pistol, sometimes two, not hesitating to take a life.  Concerned moms began writing in, and shortly thereafter Batman made a commitment to never take a life.  Originally Batman began as a creature of the night, and when we jump to the Modern Age, we find he's returned to the dark side, so to speak.

Sold as a set of four covers, along with

Batman-The Silver Age, Batman-The Bronze Age, and

Batman- The Modern Age

SET OF FOUR

Review the other three stamps in the set

BEVIL ISSUE

SCOTT#

CATEGORY 

CANCELLED

LOCATION 

MAIN LOT

ARTIST’S PROOFS

DCPs

AFDCS VARIETY

COFFEE BREAK

GRAEBNER

TOTAL ISSUE SIZE 

 

 

617

4935

FDC           

October 9, 2014

NY NY 10199

150

10

35

1

1

1

198

 

  

The original Batman was written in the style of the pulp magazines, as evidenced by Batman’s seemingly little, or no, remorse over killing or maiming criminals.  Over the course of the first few Batman strips, elements were added to the character- a more pronounced jawline, while the ears on the costume were lengthened, thus he became a more mature Batman.  It was Detective Comics #33 when his origin was revealed, establishing the brooding persona of Batman, a character driven by the murder of his parents and his lifelong pursuit to avenge their deaths.  Writer Bill Finger depicts a young Bruce Wayne witnessing his parent’s murder at the hands of a mugger.  By Detective Comics #38, the pulp-inflected portrayal of Batman was starting to soften.  This was when his sidekick, Robin, made his introduction. 

 

Read the article in its entirety in the July 2015 

Bevil newsletter, which accompanies the cover.

A set must have two characteristics- all the covers must be different, as well as the same.  In my 25 years of painting set, I've never designed a set with covers having the same rendering.  On the other hand, each cover shares common design elements. In the Batman set, all four issues share the copy box, along with the Gotham  City skyline, framed by the phrase, "Protector of Gotham City".